Nimbus Cloud

Project Description

Our installation is a celebration of the dialogue or interplay between Waller Creek and its relationship to the vitality of Lady Bird Lake and the surrounding urban community. By utilizing the built environment of Waller Creek, we are drawing attention to the symbiosis that can manifest between man and nature when urban settings are designed with maximum consideration and respect for the natural resources and native species of the environment itself.

“Nimbus Cloud” resembles a rain cloud and is a reflection on the vitality of Waller Creek and the nature that surrounds it. Cumulonimbus and nimbostratus clouds produce precipitation. The creek acts as a watershed by collecting this precipitation from an area of 6 miles and meandering its way to Town Lake. ‘Nimbus Cloud’ signifies one of the primary sources of Waller Creek today. Using programmable LEDs installed within the sculpture, abstracted imagery collected from Waller Creek and the areas surrounding the watershed will be conveyed onto the cloud. The water beneath the sculpture will mirror this ephemeral phenomena, creating a parallel that reflects the relationship between the creek and the environment.

Artists’ Statement

Our installation is a celebration of the dialogue or interplay between Waller Creek and its relationship to the vitality of Lady Bird Lake and the surrounding urban community. By utilizing the built environment of Waller Creek, we are drawing attention to the symbiosis that can manifest between man and nature when urban settings are designed with maximum consideration and respect for the natural resources and native species of the environment itself.

“Nimbus Cloud” resembles a rain cloud and is a reflection on the vitality of Waller Creek and the nature that surrounds it. Cumulonimbus and nimbostratus clouds produce precipitation. The creek acts as a watershed by collecting this precipitation from an area of 6 miles and meandering its way to Town Lake. ‘Nimbus Cloud’ signifies one of the primary sources of Waller Creek today. Using programmable LEDs installed within the sculpture, abstracted imagery collected from Waller Creek and the areas surrounding the watershed will be conveyed onto the cloud. The water beneath the sculpture will mirror this ephemeral phenomena, creating a parallel that reflects the relationship between the creek and the environment.

Artists’ Biographies

Autumn Ewalt

Autumn Ewalt was born in State College, Pennsylvania and grew up in west Texas. She received her BFA in Studio Art from Texas Tech University in 2001. In 2007 she received her MFA in Ceramics from Cranbrook Academy of Art. In addition to her own studio practice, in 2010, she co-founded Animalis, an environmental art studio practice in Austin, TX with her partner, Dharmesh Patel. Animalis has exhibited throughout Austin and is currently completing a streetscape project with the City of Austin Art in Public Places. Autumn also has a forthcoming TEMPO project commissioned by the City of Austin Art in Public Places.

Dharmesh Patel

Dharmesh Patel is an artist, architect and an engineer. He graduated from the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York City and has a Master’s Degree from the Cranbrook Academy of Art where he was awarded the Daimler Chrysler Emerging Artist Award. In 2010, he co-founded Animalis, an environmental and public art studio practice based in Austin, TX with his partner, Autumn Ewalt. Animalis has exhibited throughout Austin and has completed public art project with the City of Austin among other cities. His studio practice intersects technology, perception and phenomea.

Animalis

Autumn Ewalt, Dharmesh Patel

Deep Curiosity

Project Description

A 50’ diameter arch comprised of 10 curved segments of steel or aluminum 1’ C channels that will be bolted together. Small steel or aluminum coves will run along the inside of the flanges to serve as a trough for flexible linear LED lighting that is capable of changing colors and patterns. The interior web of the channels will be painted white to increase reflectivity. The arch will set on steel pedestals situated on the creek bottom beneath the shallow water. Lastly, guy wired will support the lateral and gravity loads of the arch.

Artists’ Statement

At this particular site—between 5th and 6th Streets—along Waller Creek, stained concrete walls drop down to a soupy pool. Guardrails line the tops of retaining walls to form a viewing platform where visitors can peer into the murky waters below. There is no flora or fauna, there are no rocks to generate surface distortions, not even graffiti to mark the walls surrounding this urban trench. The experience here is a downward gaze and the viewer is left to wonder about the nature of the place. It is an unfinished space, partly natural, partly man-made.

Deep Curiosity offers an alternative to the void—a view to the enlivened, complete Waller Creek experience that we know is imminent. A partially submerged, larger-than-life circular form finds its delicate balance in the murky water like an object from the future civilization. The scale of this inwardly glowing round form lifts the viewers’ eyes and imagination up and around. With no beginning and no end, the ring offers a glimpse of something whole and total, through which the full spatial possibility of this place is imagined. The depth of the dark abyss will be called to attention as well, as the massive ring is half submerged, allowing reality and illusion to coalesce and complete an object whose form and scale exist to encourage delight and epiphany with the use of curved steel and LED lighting. The object offers viewers a careful array of elements balanced precariously yet precisely in its place on Waller Creek, suggesting a future site where perfection is possible.

Artists’ Biographies

Tim Derrington

Tim graduated with a B.Arch. and a B.S. in Environmental Design the University of Houston. Since receiving his degrees, he has worked in Houston, New York, and Austin, TX,  gaining experience in both residential and commercial projects. In 2011, Tim established Derrington Building Studio with a focus on thoughtful, regional architecture and has been featured in a host of international architecture media outlets. In addition to the directing the studio, Tim is a founding member of the East Side Collective + Drophouse Design (a co-working studio that fosters new design talent) and an active member of the AIA.

Wilson Hanks

Wilson graduated with a B.A. in Art History from the University of Virginia and a Masters of Architecture (M.Arch) from the University of Texas at Austin. After receiving her degree, she worked with Dick Clark + Associates in Austin, TX,  gaining experience in both residential and commercial projects before starting her own small-scale design firm in 2015. Her first project, a 650 sqft residential remodel was published both nationally and internationally. In addition to running her company, Wilson is an active member of both the Austin Chapter of the AIA and the Texas Society of Architects. In 2016, Wilson was named “Associate of the Year” by AIA Austin.

East Side Collective + Drophouse Design

Tim Derrington, Wilson Hanks

Invisible and Absolute

Project Description

“Invisible and Absolute” is a sculpture of an extinct sea lizard called a mosasaur, commissioned specifically for Waller Creek Conservancy’s 2016 Creek Show. Mosasaurs swam through the shallow sea that covered Central Texas 100 –65 million years ago. In 1935, an almost complete skeleton was found in Onion Creek by UT geology students and is now on exhibit at the Texas Memorial Museum on the UT campus. When asked to create a piece for Creek Show, Jules Buck Jones immediately thought of this extinct animal swimming in the form of a skeleton, offering a little bit of history and the façade of fantasy. Extinct creatures like the mosasaur are simultaneously very real and very not, only present today in the form of fossilized bone. “Invisible and Absolute” asks the question: What is scarier? A 40’ monster or extinction itself?

Artist’s Statement

All of my creative endeavors reflect a deep interest in the natural sciences. My paintings depict abstracted flora and fauna, entangled in a variety of relationships. Dense patterns, saturated colors, and crowded scenes reflect a complexity and synchronicity of a multi-faceted, many layered world. The work fuses the science and the mystery of biological interests such as evolution, mutation, and extinction. Room for narrative and myth are encouraged through composite imagery and tiers of abstraction.

Invisible and Absolute is a sculpture of an extinct sea lizard called a mosasur, commissioned specifically for Waller Creek Conservancy’s 2016 Creek Show. Mosasaurs swam through the shallow sea that covered Central Texas 100 – 65 million years ago. In 1935, an almost full skeleton was found in Onion Creek, by UT geology students and is now on exhibit at the Texas Memorial Museum on the UT campus. When I was asked to create a piece for Creek Show, I immediately thought of this extinct animal swimming in the form of a skeleton, offering a little but of history and the façade of fantasy. Extinct creatures like the mosasaur are simultaneously very real and very not, only present today in the form of fossilized bone. Invisible and Absolute asks the question: What is scarier? A 40’ monster or extinction itself?

Artist’s Biography

Jules Buck Jones draws, paints, and builds objects and images that fuse his interest in biology and mythology. A 2008 alumni of UT Austin’s MFA program, Jules works and shows extensively throughout TX. He recently completed a series of multi-media performances funded by a grant from the City of Austin. He is the president of the non-profit, East Austin collective, MASS Gallery, and currently teaches painting and drawing at TX State University. Jules has participated in the 2011 and 2013 TX Biennials, was commissioned to create a site specific installation for the 2013 TX Contemporary Art Fair and has exhibited work at the Blanton Museum of Art, The Contemporary Austin, and the Southeast Texas Museum of Art. Jules is currently working towards a solo show in Houston in 2017, at David Shelton Gallery.

Jules Buck Jones

The Creek Zipper

Project Description

The Creek Zipper is a series of interconnected units that form zipper-like strands. Each unit varies depending on the width of the strand creating a dynamic overall geometry that ebbs and flows much like the water level of the creek itself. Though the water level will stabilize once the Tunnel Project is complete, the level will still rise and drop within manageable limits. Each unit will be raised on adjustable pedestal so the flat bottom of the unit will coincide with the average water level. When the water level is below average, the water will pass below the strands and be only minimally affected by the legs that support the units. When the water level rises above average, the water will interact with the folded geometry of each unit causing a turbulent flow. The distortion of water as it rises reflects the devastation that used to occur during floods.

The Creek Zipper is an array of arrays. The project consists of a number of a strands that extend the length of the creek between the 6th Street Bridge and the 3 concrete steps that span the river between 6th and 7th Street. The strands are free-flowing and occasionally intersect and join one another to form larger strands. Each strand varies from the others, differing in length and width. The strands are made up of an array of CNC-milled aluminum units that connect to form the overall zipper. The units and strands are part of an assemblage that favors neither whole or part. The entire project, each strand, and each unit can be read as whole in and of itself, calling to question the hierarchical part/whole relationship that has traditionally dominated art and architecture for much of their histories. Though the strands and units are similar to each other and have the same generic properties, the specific geometry of each one is unique as a result of its association with the overall assemblage, it’s location on the site and how it joins with neighboring units.

Artist’s Statement

Before completion of the Waller Creek Tunnel Project, Waller Creek was prone to massive flooding – an event that would cut off Austin’s east side from downtown. East Austin is an area that has been oft disconnected from Austin proper, having faced economic and social isolation in the past. With the recent uptick in commercial investment and ongoing development, many of its lifelong residents are now being displaced. The Creek Zipper draws attention to both the socioeconomic and physical divide in an area of Austin that should be connecting these vastly different, but equally important neighborhoods. When the Waller Creek Tunnel Project is complete, the creek will be a useful and productive public space for the city that will act as a connector, rather than a divider.

Artist’s Biography

Kory Bieg AIA, is an Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin. Bieg has previously taught at California College of the Arts and the University of California, Berkeley. In 2005, Kory Bieg founded OTA+, an architecture, design and research office that specializes in the application of advanced digital technologies for the design and construction of projects of all types and scale. OTA+ uses current design software and CNC machine tools to both generate and construct conceptually rigorous and formally unique design proposals. Their work has been exhibited widely and published in blogs, journals, magazines and books. Kory Bieg received his Master of Architecture from Columbia University in New York City and his Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from Washington University in Saint Louis. He is a registered architect in the states of California and Texas, Chair of TxA Emerging Design + Technology, and co-Director of TEX-FAB Digital Fabrication Alliance.

OTA+

Kory Bieg

Phantom Diversion

Project Description

Austin, Texas, was settled and built around rivers and creeks. Today, it is one of the fastest growing cities in the country. The resulting tension between the built and natural environment is epitomized by Waller Creek, which fl ows through downtown Austin and eventually drains into Lady Bird Lake. Through the construction of the new storm water bypass tunnel, potential fl oodwaters will be diverted underground which will allow for the enhancement of both human and ecological communities. The tunnel will allow for the formation of a riparian park that will allow for passive and active recreation as well as create a series of rain gardens and biofi ltration devices that treat pollutants. While these constructions are decidedly man-made, they serve the ultimate goal of improving cultural and ecological health of the city.

Artists’ Statement

Kory Bieg AIA, is an Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin. Bieg has previously taught at California College of the Arts and the University of California, Berkeley. In 2005, Kory Bieg founded OTA+, an architecture, design and research office that specializes in the application of advanced digital technologies for the design and construction of projects of all types and scale. OTA+ uses current design software and CNC machine tools to both generate and construct conceptually rigorous and formally unique design proposals. Their work has been exhibited widely and published in blogs, journals, magazines and books. Kory Bieg received his Master of Architecture from Columbia University in New York City and his Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from Washington University in Saint Louis. He is a registered architect in the states of California and Texas, Chair of TxA Emerging Design + Technology, and co-Director of TEX-FAB Digital Fabrication Alliance.

Artists’ Biographies

Alisa West

In 2013, Alisa founded Westshop Design, a small design build firm specializing in residential and small-scale commercial landscape projects. Her work is based on the idea that outdoor spaces must be considered both artistically and technically and within the context of the environment, architecture and cultural setting.

Alisa’s work has been recognized with the Fall 2011 Design Excellence Award for Advanced Studio and inclusion in the 2012 Architecture Center Houston and Houston Chapter of the American Institute of Architects Student Biennale. She was also the recipient of the American Society of Landscape Architects Certificate of Honor. Most recently her work was part of the winning submission for the AIA Austin Design Awards for the S. 3rd Residence and published in Atomic Ranch Magazine.

Travis Cook

Travis Cook grew up in the Front Range mountains of Colorado. Since Graduating from UT, Cook has worked for and collaborated with numerous Austin Based Architects, Artists and Designers includ-ing Murray Legge Architecture, Legge Lewis Legge, Matt Fajkus Architecture, Thoughtbarn, Page/, Studio Autoforma, UTSOA MatLab, and Artist Nancy Mims.

His current and past clients include Whole Foods Market, SXSW, Sackman Enterpris-es, Kennedy Creative, Fusebox Festival, Icelantic Skis, The University of Texas at Austin, The Dallas Arboretum, and the Waller Creek Conservancy.

He formed Cookshop in 2014, where he designs and fabricates lighting, furniture and installations. In 2015 Cook co-found-ed Raum Industries with fellow UTSOA Alum Ken Dineen. Raum Industries focuses on the design and production of event-based, experiential installations. He continues a close collaboration with Legge Lewis Legge, providing design and fabrication support on a range of public art installations.

West Shop | Cook Shop

Alisa West, Travis Cook